All posts filed under: Noodles

Singapore bihun

Singapore Bee Hoon

What is Singapore bee hoon? I asked myself.  To be honest, I don’t know.  I googled hoping to find the answer but for the first time ever, Mr Google doesn’t have a straight answer for me. Interestingly, there are conflicting stories about Singapore bee hoon across the web – some say it’s a dish invented out of Hong Kong which doesn’t really exist in Singapore, others claim that the use of curry powder actually lends the name to this dish.   But why call it Singapore bee hoon and not Hong Kong-style bee hoon or even Curry bee hoon??? Well, we can go around arguing who’s right and who’s wrong, but who cares right? Since it’s so delicious, we’ll just leave it at that, ok :).  Bee hoon (or rice vermicelli) is a popular noodle in Asia because it’s so versatile.  You can stir-fry or boil with a soup base and use any ingredients to flavour the dish.  By nature, they are tasteless, so they rely on other fresh ingredients or seasoning for flavours.  The key to stir-fry is to ensure bee hoon is dried well before stir-frying. Singapore …

Yakiudon

Easy Weekday Meal : Yakiudon

Did you know that it’s only 5 weeks away from Christmas?  Melbourne CBD’s starting to look and feel like Christmas with Myer’s popular Christmas window display up.  Each year, their window display shares a beautiful short story about a character with a touch of that Christmas spirit of sharing and caring.  Lil’ one was so wowed by the display and may I say that the crowd is just huge, huge! Good work yet again, Myer. Now that we’re talking about Christmas, have you been naughty or nice this year? Last year, I asked for a cast iron skillet from Santa but I didn’t get one, maybe because I was naughty, I guess 😦   So, for this year, no more waiting for Santa, I went and got myself a Christmas gift – A Lodge cast iron skillet woo-hoo! and at $52 – it’s quite a steal.  Can’t wait to cook more with this brand new gift! Today I’m taking a break from chinese takeout and instead made a very easy one-plate dinner dish.  It’s a special request by my lil’ one because …

Poached chicken and soba noodles

Poached Chicken and Soba Noodle Salad with Soy Dressing

Since coming home, I’ve been trying to get back into a healthier lifestyle.  Having eaten lots of oily, fried and spicy BUT ultra ultra delicious foods in Kuala Lumpur, I need to give my body and mind a bit of a break. Wait! Did I just said that?  LOL 🙂  On top of it, I’ve also put on a massive MASSIVE 3 kilos – so I am feeling a wee bit over weight at the moment too 😦 How am I getting into my Chinese Cheongsam this Feb? Must eat healthy – oh well, at least some level of healthy food 🙂 HAHAHA I came across this recipe in my ‘almost-forgotten’ recipe collection.  Have you ever read a recipe and imagined it to be a boring dish with unattractive colors and boring flavours, especially when the hero ingredient is something that you don’t really like?  Yeah, this recipe features the breast part of the chicken which I have always disliked. BUT BUT BUT … After tasting this dish, I take back all my words!  The simple cooking naturally brings out the generosity of texture and …

Char kuey teow

Homesick with Malaysian Char Kuey Teow

Jeng jeng jeng jeng – I introduce to you my homesick dish – the Char Kuey Teow (CKT) – the dish that rules my foodie world and one of the most popular dish in Malaysia, I dare say, definitely as popular as nasi lemak, penang laksa, chicken rice and assam laksa.  But if you ask me to rank, I would rank them all as my no.1 favourites!  So hard to choose sides, you know especially when I love to eat so much and they taste equally good 🙂 CKT is not just a plate of friendly fried flat noodles (kuey teow) with soy sauce.  It’s a dish that’s packed with taste and flavour using only the simplest ingredients.  Not forgetting, the sweat too!  So, how did they do it?  3 things – breath of the wok (wok hei), constant cling clang sound between the wok and the wok chan (wok spatula) or wok hoak (wok ladle) and lastly, the speed of frying. I tried to copycat the style of frying this dish (the non stop cling clang sound and the …

Japchae

Japchae

I love everything that spells noodles.  Fast to cook, furiously versatile and kids just love it.  My love affair with noodles began when I had my first set of baby teeth.  I recalled my first plate of plain noodles was so enjoyable and that relationship with noodles was passed on to my lil’ one.  She had the same expression after tasting her first plate of noodles.  They are also my life-saviour when I was staying on my own in uni.  I didn’t know how to cook then and packet noodles (although unhealthy) was my go-to meal for breakfast, lunch, breakfast or supper. There are so many variations of noodles – from Malaysian favourites like hokkien mee, wan tan mee to Japanese udon to Italian pasta to Korean noodles. Japchae is a Korean dish made from sweet potato noodles and stir-fry with mixed vegetables and various type of meats. Cooked to the right texture and you’ll get chewy and springy textured noodles.  The noodles are cooked separately in boiling hot water until al dante.  The rest of the ingredients are stir-fried separately. …

Hokkien Mee

Malaysian Hokkien Mee

Recently, I have been punishing myself with day dreams of Malaysian delicacies that I am missing so terribly – like the sinfully tasty black KL style Hokkien Mee.  Each time I go back to Malaysia, I will drop by my favourite PJ Jalan 222 shop – Restaurant Ahwa for their tasty Hokkien Mee.  As you also know, Malaysians eat more than 3 meals a day 🙂 So, for supper, my neighbourhood shop, Nanking Restaurant, in USJ will be my cure for a late night craving of a good Hokkien Mee. So what makes a good Hokkien Mee? Based on my many trials and experiment of this dish, the key ingredients are: 1) The black sauce – like it or not, it’s the sauce that can break or make the dish.  In this recipe, the black sauce was created using Cheong Chan Thick Caramel Sauce.  This sauce is black and sticky with high caramel (sugar) content and taste more savoury compare to dark soy sauce.  Available at all Asian Grocers. 2) Crispy fried pork fat – …

Chicken Slice Flat Noodle Soup

Kai See Hor Fun (Noodle Soup with Shredded Chicken)

This is a winning Malaysian dish – anybody who hails from Ipoh or have been to Ipoh would fall in love with this simple noodle soup.  The best Kai See Hor Fun (those found in Ipoh) will taste significantly different compare to the mediocre ones – with silky smooth hor fun (flat rice noodles) and addictively rich chicken-prawn soup stock. Unfortunately, staying in Melbourne deprives me of this delicious and heartwarming dish.  No restaurant in Melbourne has made the mark and I am so missing this dish.  So my search for the recipe continues until I stumbled upon The Food Canon and voila! So, now, I can make this wonderfully tasty noodle soup at the comfort of my own home.  Go on, have a go and let me know what you think… Kai See Hor Fun (Noodle Soup with Shredded Chicken) (adapted from The Food Canon) Serves 4 Ingredients: 2 litres of water 1/2 chicken 300-500g fresh prawns Vegetable oil 1 tbsp chicken stock powder, optional 1 pack fresh flat noodles Chicken shreds, for garnish Spring …

Prawn Vermicelli

Recently I’ve been trying very hard to improve my photography and emulating the minimalist look – so the photo above shows minimalist by having nothing except for a couple of coriander leaves and a claypot of the most delicious prawn vermicelli sitting on a blue napkin.  I’ve not mastered the look yet but I’m learning a lot on creating props, food styling, lighting and shooting still life.  Not easy I can say… but I have faith and as any other photographer will advise, “Keep practicing”. I was excited to try this recipe because it’s not only easy to make, it was very very delicious – greatly inspired by tastes of Thailand.  As a working mother, I love any recipes that will save me time especially the ones that I can just dump everything into a pot and leave it to cook – good for weekday dinner or lazy weekend meal. As you know, vermicelli is tasteless by itself.  So, marrying it with other ingredients and sauces makes it really delicious. The key ingredient here is …

Fried Radish Cake (Chai Tow Kway)

Fried radish cake (better known to Malaysians & Singaporeans) as Chai Tow Kway has always been my favourite Singapore hawker food.  There are two versions – the white and the black.  I personally prefer the black version – not sure why, but something about the black sweet sauce that called out to me 🙂 Finding a genuinely delicious Chai Tow Kway in Melbourne is like finding a needle in the haystack.  Most of the commercial restaurants out there put too much flour and little radish.  So, I decided to make it at home from scratch 🙂 As advised by the recipe writer, increasing the amount of radish and water will yield more tender texture, while more flour will give you more ‘bite’.  Based on the radish-water ratio, this recipe will yield more tender texture, which is the way I like.  I prefer to make the radish cake overnight so it’s easier to cut and fry the next day. My hubby absolutely love this dish.  I have added more chai poh and garlic so it’s more aromatic. …